5 Makeup Tips from a Pro Makeup Artist

Make Sure Your Interview Subject Shines on Camera

Published on in Advice / Tips & Tricks

Assignment Desk makeup artist Crisger Santley works with corporate video, TV, film, print, and fashion clients in the greater Washington, DC area.

Being in front of the camera is not easy. This is especially true for corporate clients with less experience in the spotlight. When being interviewed on camera, there are small details that can make a major impact on the final video. Makeup Artist Crisger Santley delivers her top five makeup and hair tips for interview shoots.

1. Skin: Maintaining a daily skin care routine is the single most important thing you can do to make your skin look flawless. Daily application of a rich, high-quality moisturizer is a must! This will help prevent your skin from becoming dry and flaky. With dry, flaky skin, makeup sits on top of your face instead of blending in and this won’t look good on camera. Don't forget to apply hand lotion too!

2. Foundation: Water-based foundations are usually the best choice for high-definition cameras. Make sure your makeup is applied evenly as cameras will pick up hard brush marks and other imperfections. In fact, “barely there” make-up is perfect for corporative video interviews. Don’t forget to apply a matte loose powder to avoid looking shiny on camera.

3. Eyes & lips: When it comes to a corporate shoot, eye makeup shouldn't be too dramatic. Eyeshadow plays a very important role and bright colors such as blue or green will read badly on camera. Remember, it's a professional video interview and not a fashion show.

Choose neutral eyeshadow colors such as beige, brown, taupe and nude. It's important that your eyeliner, mascara and lashes are kept natural as well. If you decide to get false eyelashes, please don’t get the huge ones—less is more in this case. 

Lips must look hydrated. Use a pop of color, but not a crazy hue, on your lips so it will create a good balance between more natural eye makeup and colored lips. If possible, try to brush your teeth right before your interview and double-check that you don't have anything in your teeth before you go on camera.

 

4. Hair: If you plan to have your hair done on set by the hair and makeup department, show up for your interview with clean and dry hair. Doing so will accelerate the styling time (believe me, the hairstylist will appreciate it a lot). If you decide to do your own hair, style your hair as neatly as possible. The camera will catch every fly-away and out of place strand of hair. Gentlemen, get a fresh haircut for your interview and a very close shave. If you have a beard, make sure it is neatly groomed and trimmed.

5. Finally, be on time. You don’t want to look anxious, nervous or stressed out in front of the camera. Give yourself enough time to make sure that your outfit is clean, ironed and lint-free and your manicure looks perfect.

Want to book one of our incredible hair and makeup artists, like Crisger, on an upcoming shoot? Visit Assignment Desk

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About the Author

Crisger Santley
Crisger Santley
Crisger Santley is an Assignment Desk makeup artist and licensed esthetician. For the last ten years, she has provided makeup artistry, skin care, and hair styling services to TV, film, print, and fashion clients in the greater Washington, DC area.

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