24 blog posts found matching keyword search for: aerial shots
How To Get The Perfect Aerial Shot
by Danny Groner, ShutterstockSetting the scene for any video can be tricky. You need to orient the viewer to what they’re about to see, and you’ve got to do it quickly or run the risk of creating an unwanted distraction at the top of your production. Many TV shows open up with a series of punchy establishing shots, first of a cityscape, then of a building within it, then the office within the building. It happens quickly, within a matter of seconds, but it leaves viewers with the background they need before buying into the dialogue and action that follows. The initial aerial shots shouldn’t be taken for granted, though, as they can deliver much more than just a beautiful view of a city. When choosing a clip for the city at hand, consider also the tone and feeling of the clip and the way it was shot. For a busy, office setting scene, open with a faster, more frantic, and tighter city shot - even consider time-lapse. If introducing a more lighthearted scene, let the opening aerial footage clip breathe for longer and go wider to really showcase the panorama. Make sure that the aerial footage lines up with the sentiment of the scene that follows-it really influences your audience’s mind-set going into what comes next. Here are some powerful, atmospheric aerial shots from around the world:
Published on Monday, February 18, 2013 5:53 PM
Drone vs. Helicopter for Aerials: Top 5 Scenarios for Each
So you're a Director or Producer who trolls on Vimeo for creative ideas and inspiration. After weeding through a gazillion time-lapse and steadicam videos, you've hit on a school of ridiculously beautiful aerial shots. You keep telling your creative inner self, “We’re gonna find a place for this scene in a project!” Then the perfect project rolls around, and you put the shot into the storyboards and base another 3-4 shots on this visual hook because the ideas is so awesome. And you're super stoked. Then the Buzzkill happens...
Published on Thursday, September 18, 2014 9:40 AM
Mercedes-Benz Poland Spot Captures the Life of a GOPR Rescuer in 90 Seconds
Director, Antek Nykowski, describes the challenges of filming the day to day activities of the mountain rescuers and the use of aerial drones and RED dragon to enhance the shots.
Published on Monday, September 14, 2015 9:00 AM
Drones and Their Impact in the Film Industry
Drones have become more and more popular to the film industry in recent years. A vast number of feature films are being shot using drones. Both mainstream and indie filmmakers have opted to use drones in order to capture aerial shots and the results are stunning!
Published on Monday, October 2, 2017 10:00 AM
Getting Started with Drone Production: Save Time and Money
by Stephan Guarch & Edgar Cohen Aerial photography and videography are nothing new to the production world. But how we achieve those shots certainly has in the last 12 months. Drones have exploded in popularity as a way to get aerial and low altitude footage for videos, for everything from full feature films such as “The Wolf of Wall Street” to the everyday film hobbyist who flies leisurely at the local park. But for anyone who has actually tried to capture this footage there’s quite the learning curve involved when it comes to choosing the right drone and what seems like an infinite amount of accessories and upgrades. This week the team at Experience Above posts a nice overview of the top 3 tips for getting started with drone video production, a handy starters guide.
Published on Monday, August 11, 2014 3:22 PM
New Workflows for a New Year: Airborne AI Taking Over
It was January of 2013 when something called the Phantom was released by DJI a Chinese UAV manufacturer. The Phantom was a remotely operated platform to add a GoPro camera for capturing aerial video and photos. This was ground breaking for most filmmakers and hobbyist since it was a way to add a high budget look to their work at low costs. Since 2013 DJI among many other manufacturers have raised the bar on technology and the growth of the drone industry has sky rocketed.
Published on Monday, December 19, 2016 9:56 AM
A Guide to Cinematography Drones and the Laws that Govern Them
Thanks to small, high-quality digital cameras, professional and personal drones have completely transformed the production industry, letting filmmakers capture shots that were previously unattainable to non-studio filmmakers. To capture aerial footage a few years ago, you had to either book time in a helicopter containing a professional operator, remote head, and bulky HD camera, or, for lower altitudes, rent the services of a small remote helicopter and operator from a company like Flying-Cam or Coptervision. As you can probably guess, helicopters don’t come cheap.
Published on Wednesday, May 4, 2016 11:00 AM
Drone Services Are More Accessible Than Ever. What's Next?
Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are taking over the skies. They’re being used for everything from “reality capture” (as detailed for businesses to sheer enjoyment by hobbyists. As regulations become clearer and equipment grows increasingly affordable and user-friendly, the production industry is taking up its fair share of the sky, too. More video crews than ever are certified to fly small UAVs for commercial purposes. For more on what this means for both production crews and clients looking to hire drone services, we talked to Ryan Goble, Senior DP and FAA-certified drone pilot at Running Pony.
Published on Tuesday, August 15, 2017 11:00 AM
The Secret to Creating a High-Quality Film without the High Price Tag
Whether you’re a filmmaker with a blockbuster budget or you’re more on the indie side, all production teams want to save money. One way to seriously cut down costs — and save time — is by using stock media for certain shots that might otherwise break the bank or be too time-consuming to shoot yourself.
Published on Wednesday, August 8, 2018 10:00 AM
Method Studios Demolishes Downtown Los Angeles in "San Andreas"
The action thriller "San Andreas," now in theaters, is packed with catastrophic destruction, achieved in part through 247 complex visual effects shots executed by Method Studios facilities. As one of the main visual effects vendors on the film, Method was responsible for the entire downtown Los Angeles sequence, in which an earthquake decimates the city, and also contributed to the San Francisco sequence.
Published on Monday, June 15, 2015 10:23 AM
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