HELP! There's a green screen in my living room!

Advice / Tips & Tricks Wednesday, November 18, 2020
On March 9, 2020 I was riding high. I had just wrapped up a busy job with a major financial company and my 1st quarter was turning out to be the best period for my 4-year-old business yet. It seemed like my young production company was turning toward a bright and busy future and as the weekend came I was planning on celebrating with my friends. I was also turning 34. As the week rolled on and the Coronavirus was coming into view in the Bay Area, upcoming clients began canceling one by one, starting with a live streaming conference the following week. It surprised me at first how quickly all my work was evaporating but by the end of the week with the economy closing down and shelter in place beginning it seemed inevitable that everything on the books would be canceled.

Director Rik Reinholdtsen Brings a Show Stopping Cinematic Look to HBO Max's Legendary

Exclusive Interviews Friday, November 6, 2020
HBO Max’s Legendary isn’t the first reality competition series to shine a light on a fascinating slice of LGBTQ+ culture, but series director Rik Reinholdtsen brought a showstopping cinematic look to the Ballroom competition show’s first season that is unlike anything you've ever seen before. Reinholdtsen (Cooked with Cannabis, Inside the Actor’s Studio, Chelsea) shot with the Canon EOS C700 Full-Frame Cinema Camera, EOS C500 Mark II, and Sumire Prime Lenses to create a larger-than-life look that matched the majesty of the Ballroom performances, which blend dance, performance art and fashion. Reinholdtsen used the same gear to shoot in the field for the documentary portions of the show, helping him achieve a cohesive look. We spoke exclusively to Reinholdtsen about his experience on Legendary, why Canon was the right choice for this project, and what inspired the show’s aesthetic.

RED Dragon Visual Lens Comparison for Directors

Director's Cut Monday, June 16, 2014
by featured blog contributor, Jeremy PinckertSometimes when I’m in the thick of pre-production on a new television advertising spot, I’m tempted to put all of my emphasis on the obvious questions: Who will be the cinematographer? What camera system will we use? What casting decisions need to be made? Who the hell can convert my scribbles into a real storyboard?There’s a step often left out of the above question process, but one that, as a Director or Producer, does have a significant effect on your picture. In fact, this step is the first point of contact between the enigma of a performance and the camera.
Showing 1 — 4 of 4 total blog posts with matching tag(s).